In preparation for our 52nd Annual Meeting in Orlando, we have collected our available behavioral health sessions to attend throughout the week below. Be sure to read up and register for your favorites!

Tuesday, March 17, 2020

8:00 am – 10:00 am

Volunteers are an invaluable component for burn camps. Without them, most camps would not be able to operate. Therefore, the training and management of these volunteers is a crucial component to the success of these camps. This session will focus on effective training techniques and management of volunteers so as to create a positive camp experience for all.

8:00 am – 10:00 am

A variety of preclinical models have been described in the literature for burn research. Multiple species and approaches have been used for modeling many different aspects of burn care. Some strategies are considered more appropriate and translatable than others, depending on the endpoint being examined. In year 2 of a 3 year series, this research SIG will have experts in various areas of burn research describe the pros and cons of animal models used. Specific emphasis will be given on how clinical care is mimicked in preclinical models of inhalation injury, cutaneous burns, sepsis/infection, and scarring.

10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Discussion on complex wound management and timing/indications for therapies such as laser treatments, scar release, steroids. The effectiveness of splints and long-term results of splint therapy will be discussed. The psychosocial aspects of burn care specific to the pediatrics population will be reviewed.

11:00 am – 1:00 pm

Teens today are facing challenges unique to their generation. They are bringing those challenges with them; to their injury, to their treatment, and to their aftercare. We are in desperate need of education regarding adolescent brain development and how it interfaces with suicide and substance use/abuse. Assessment and interventions of these two topics will be our priority.

4:15 pm – 5:30 pm

The ABuRN Multi-Center Burn Research Town Hall is supported and directed by the ABA Burn Science Advisory Panel (BSAP). It is a forum for all clinical trial researchers and participants in the ABA to learn about current and pending multi-center clinical trials, as well as present potential clinical trial proposals/protocols that are in development.

Wednesday, March 18, 2020

6:30 am – 7:45 am

The purpose of this session will be to allow attendees to share local inpatient and outpatient practices regarding adjunctive therapies for managing pain and sedation, as guidelines and evidence-based recommendations are lacking (e.g., ketamine, dexmedetomidine, atypical antipsychotics, liposomal bupivacaine, clonidine, methadone, etc.). Relevant issues during the transition from inpatient to outpatient care will be addressed including: ordering, dosing, preparation, administration, monitoring, safety, and efficacy endpoints.

6:30 am – 7:45 am

Burn center success depends greatly on the strength of its nursing and physician leadership. The relationship between those two prongs of leadership can be challenging as they frequently have different priorities, different reporting structures, and different experiences that have shaped their point of view. Building an honest, open line of communication is possible with a shared mental model, shared decision making, and approaching any conflicts with the assumption of positive intent. This will be an open forum to discuss challenges and successes with a burn center leadership team.

6:30 am – 7:45 am

Socializing isn’t what it used to be. No matter how many times they may be “liked,” or despite the number of “friends” listed on their social media accounts, teenagers today are missing out. Burn camps are not only a place for recovery and healing, they are not only a place for recovery and healing, they are one of the last places where adolescent and teens are finding connection. Learn how socialization and peer connection in the methods of songs, games, and activities break the barrier of a distracted and disconnected generation.

6:30 am – 7:45 am

Surveys of trauma survivors inform us that spiritual/religious beliefs play an important role in recovery. Further research suggests that spiritual health/spiritual distress play an important role in how patients make meaning of their trauma injuries and how their arc of recovery unfolds. A burn injury can affect the spiritual needs of the burn patient and their family. In this symposium, we will discuss these unique aspects and explore the question of how suffering through this distress can aid burn survivors in moving from reliving the story of their trauma to rewriting the story of their lives.

6:30 am – 7:45 am

Burn researchers face many challenges when it comes to recruitment and retention of burn survivors in adult and pediatric studies. Barriers to study participation include study design, geography, and subject inclusion/exclusion criteria as well as many others. Based on experience in adult and pediatric clinical trials and longitudinal database research, the moderators will facilitate an examination of the challenges facing researchers and discuss strategies for improvement. The LIBRE Journey, Preschool LIBRE and the Burn Model System National Database studies as well as examples brought by the participants will serve as case studies for our discussion.

10:00 am – 12:00 pm

There are many challenges to providing rehabilitation therapy services in the critical care setting, but also new opportunities to advance practices to allow for safe, early interventions during periods of intensive care. This session will review current technologies, scientific studies regarding mobilization in critical care, and practical approaches and guidance for implementing new therapy protocols. The session will be led by a multidisciplinary team of presenters to provide a holistic view of both the barriers and potential of therapy during the early time period following burn injury.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

This session will begin with a holistic discussion of the multi-faceted treatment of adult and adolescent patients with self-inflicted burn injuries. National data regarding prevalence will be presented as well as research findings regarding pre-morbid characteristics and outcomes. The presenters will provide information about best practices when treating adult and pediatric patients with self-inflicted injuries. The forum will also include discussion of the impact of caring for this unique patient population on the providers and strategies for supporting the burn team.

Thursday March 19, 2020

6:30 am – 7:45 am

In this session, we will review what the Firefighters Burn Institutes practice in regard to running our Youth Firesetter Intervention Program with partnering agencies. We will also review the statistics that we have gathered from our own program and the databases that are utilized to run our program efficiently. The goal is to discuss ideas on how to improve current practices.

6:30 am – 7:45 am

Speciality burn centers often cover a large catchment area. Discharging patients who require specialized care can be a challenge, especially in rural areas where access to healthcare is limited. Integration of care with local providers is essential to a smooth transition back to the burn survivor’s community. Topics to address will include wound care and assessment, pain management, rehab therapies, and psychosocial support. Follow-up modalities, including the use of telemedicine will be discussed. This symposium will explore ways to provide continuity of care and ensure successful rehabilitation of burn-injured patients in rural areas after discharge from a burn center.

6:30 am – 6:45 am

Moral distress occurs when one knows what the right thing to do is, but is unable to act accordingly. Such distress arises for health care providers when doing what is best for the patient conflicts with what is best for other patients, other providers, the organization, family, or society as a whole. If unaddressed, moral distress results in moral residue, which is what we carry with us when we have been compromised morally, and the moral residue crescendo, which occurs after repeated instances of moral compromise. Situations that cause moral distress and ways to address moral distress will be discussed.

10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Burn care providers are not expected to be experts in ethics, nor should they be. However, a limited understanding of bioethical principles and concepts often leads to confusion about how to apply them and can result in unnecessary ethical quandaries. The purpose of this workshop is to provide learners with the information they need to be better utilize bioethical principles and concepts in patient care to optimize ethical decision making. In addition to the four principles of bioethics, topics covered will include informed consent, end-of-life decision making, surrogate decision making, and decision making for pediatric patients among others.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Supporting children throughout their burn treatment can be challenging. This session will educate on the role of the child life specialist and how this multidisciplinary role supports the mission of the burn team and family-centered care. This session will also provide multidisciplinary staff with education on post-traumatic growth and developmentally informed care and tips and tricks for age-appropriate interactions.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The needs of burn centers are numerous and diverse. Patients are not only looking for positive surgical outcomes, but may also be looking for psychological healing, emotional support, ways to give back, and knowledge about how to prevent future burn injuries. With limited time and resources, burn centers are stretched thin to meet all of their patients’ needs. This course will help burn centers recognize opportunities for collaboration and partnerships to assist with better burn patient outcomes and prevention of burn injuries, as well as provide examples of successful partnerships and collaborations between burn centers and community partners.

Friday, March 20, 2020

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

This MAC Forum session will review current common strategies used during most burn centers’ daily and weekly burn rounds and review current organizational behavior research to propose new ways of effective team communication and time management.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Not all therapeutic decisions in burn care are informed by large prospective randomized studies. There are often opposing approaches to the same clinical problem. Burn care providers often disagree about various therapeutic interventions for the burn patient. This session will highlight four controversial areas in burn treatment. Experts from the burn team will debate four resolutions, defending their stances on a particular care plan or strategy. Audience polling will be used to identify the attendee’s biases before the debate and their positions after the debate to see if the presented arguments change options.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Burn injuries present numerous clinical and ethical challenges to all members of the burn team. Challenging ethical cases can haunt burn caregivers for years after the fact. Cases will be presented that raise unique challenges and provide opportunities to discuss how the core ethical principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence, autonomy, and justice should be applied. Exploring the ethical questions these cases raised with uninvolved individuals can provide a new perspective and stimulate thought-provoking discourse.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Psychosocial burn recovery requires interprofessional team expertise and patient and family inclusion. An early start in aftercare planning can help the team understand the challenges, worries, strengths, resources, coping skills, goals, and hopes of families and patients. It assists with building a compassionate understanding of their experiences and assessing readiness to plan and discuss reintegration and aftercare needs and resources. Engagement strategies are presented with a specific focus on family experiences as survivors of the burn injury, and ways through which they can be supported and empowered to assist the burn survivor with aftercare and social reintegration needs.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Team work is essential for patient safety as well as staff well-being. This session will review key elements of team development through a series of fun and engaging activities. Each activity will highlight specific skills and strategies to improve communication and team building.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

There is increasing demand for evidenced-based, high-quality burn care. However, despite considerable efforts, many burn care improvement initiatives fail to be translated into clinical practice and meaningful patient outcomes. Implementation science promotes the systematic uptake of research and other improvement initiatives into routine practice or policy. Distinct from the initiative being implemented, implementation science focuses specifically in the implementation process, and has wide applications for burn care to support translational research, quality improvement, guideline implementation, and service delivery improvements with underpinnings in implementation science. This forum will explore how to implement successful and sustainable change in burn care.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

There are many outcome measures utilized in health care. This session will offer the learner information on the trends and application of outcome measures in burn rehabilitation therapy, with focus on relationship of measures to the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning (ICF) framework, including what qualities constitute a good outcome measure, what are the domains of mobility and hand function; and how outcome measures are used in practice to enhance documentation as well as to demonstrate evidence-based practice.