In preparation for our 52nd Annual Meeting in Orlando, we have collected our available nursing sessions to attend throughout the week below. Be sure to read up and register for your favorites!

Pre-Conference Programs

The Advanced Burn Life Support course is designed to provide burn care medical professionals with the ability to assess and stabilize burn-injury patients during the first critical hours post-injury. ABLS programs also support emergency preparedness needs for disaster management. Live, didactic lectures and hands-on simulation experiences are offered to reinforce learning. There will be opportunities to work with a simulated burn patient to reinforce the assessment, stabilization and transfer of the patient to an ABA burn center. Following a final written and practical assessment, a certificate of completion is provided (good for 4 years).

Registration fee covers the tuition, ABLS manual, assessment and continuing education credits/certificate (7.0 hours).

Non-Physicians Physicians
$250 $375

Pre-requisite: Successful completion of an ABLS course. A copy of the ABLS course certificate or wallet card should be presented at check-in for the ABLS Instructor course.

The Advanced Burn Life Support Instructor course is designed for clinicians interested in sharing their knowledge to train other burn care professionals. There will be a lecture about “Teaching How to Teach,” and the Instructor Candidate will present a 5 minute mini-lecture on an assigned topic and lead a group discussion of case studies as well as a patient assessment stabilization scenario.

In order to become an ABLS Instructor, you must complete the ABLS Instructor course, participate in two instructor trainee observations and be an ABA member. Instructor certificate is good for 4 years.

Registration fee covers tuition and continuing education credits/certificate (4.5 hours).

Interested in the ABLS Coordinator role? Stay for an additional 1.5 hours to learn how to run an ABLS course.

Non-Physicians Physicians
$250 $375

Tuesday, March 17, 2020

8:00 am – 10:00 am

This session will focus primarily on multicenter trials in burn nursing. Within this meeting, attendees will choose a study topic, design a protocol, discuss the IRB process, and designate participating centers for a multicenter burn nursing study. This study will culminate in a publication by participating centers which will drive standards of care in burn nursing. All meeting attendees will learn about the research process by following along. There will also be updates on other burn nursing initiatives, including the EMR in burns workgroup and burn nurse certification.

8:00 am – 10:00 am

Volunteers are an invaluable component for burn camps. Without them, most camps would not be able to operate. Therefore, the training and management of these volunteers is a crucial component to the success of these camps. This session will focus on effective training techniques and management of volunteer so as to create a positive camp experience for all.

10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Discussion on complex wound management and timing/indications for therapies such as laser treatments, scar release, steroids. The effectiveness of splints and the long-term results of splint therapy will be discussed. The psychosocial aspects of burn care specific to the pediatric population will be reviewed.

10:00 am – 1:00 pm

Learn what’s new with the Burn Care Quality Platform (BCQP), data dictionary revisions, registry, and reporting. The ABA and our vendor-partner, BData, will provide a review of the new software and offer an interactive training opportunity for burn registrars.

11:00 am – 1:00 pm

Teens today are facing challenges unique to their generation. They are bringing those challenges with them; to their injury, to their treatment, and to their aftercare. We are in desperate need of education regarding adolescent brain development and how it interfaces with suicide and substance use/abuse. Assessment and interventions of these two topics will be our priority.

1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

The Fluid Resuscitation Special Interest Group aims to: (1) Describe current, changing and future resuscitation practices in adult and pediatric burn shock resuscitation; (2) Provide an opportunity for professional discussions and debate; (3) Create a venue for networking and sharing of ideas to enhance clinical practice and future research.

1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Fundamentals of Burn Care: Critical Care is a course specifically intended for the newer burn care provider (<5 years of experience). The multi-disciplinary course will cover the basics of burn critical care management including resuscitation, hypermetabolic response, ventilator strategies, nutrition, antimicrobial therapy/sepsis and pitfalls of burn critical care. The course will include didactics, breakout sessions, simulations and panel discussion to ensure maximal learning potential.

1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

This multi-disciplinary session will focus on leadership, mentorship, and team building in the burn unit.

Wednesday, March 18, 2020

6:30 am – 7:45 am

The purpose of this session will be to allow attendees to share local inpatient and outpatient practices regarding adjunctive therapies for managing pain and sedation, as guidelines and evidence-baed recommendations are lacking (e.g., ketamine, dexmedetomidine, atypical antipsychotics, liposomal bupivacaine, clonidine, methadone, etc.). Relevant issues during the transition from inpatient to outpatient care will be addressed including: ordering, dosing, preparation, administration, monitoring, safety, and efficacy endpoints.

6:30 am – 7:45 am

Among burn centers nationwide, discrepancies exist in the use of fluids for resuscitation and maintenance as well as the approach to the management of electrolyte disorders. The purpose of this session is to allow attendees to share local practices, successes, and barriers for achieving clinical outcomes in both of these areas. Fluid resuscitation algorithms, use of albumin and balanced salt solutions, maintenance fluids, sodium disorders, and electrolyte repletion protocols will be discussed.

6:30 am – 7:45 am

Burn center success depends greatly on the strength of its nursing and physician leadership. The relationship between these two prongs of leadership can be challenging as they frequently have different priorities, different reporting structures, and different experiences that have shaped their point of view. Building an honest, open line of communication is possible with a shared mental model, shared decision making, and approaching any conflicts with the assumption of positive intent. This will be an open forum to discuss challenges and successes with a burn center leadership team.

6:30 am – 7:45 am

Resources dedicated to burn prevention programming are often limited. It can be challenging to convince hospital administration or organizational leadership that programs designed to prevent burn injuries deserve more funding, dedicated time, and personnel. This session will encourage participants to share ideas about how to best advocate for more resources for burn prevention activities. We will brainstorm new approaches to demonstrating that efforts to prevent burn injuries in the community are worthy of our focus and our funds.

6:30 am – 7:45 am

Surveys of trauma survivors inform us that spiritual/religious beliefs play an important role in recovery. Further research suggests that spiritual health/spiritual distress play an important role in how patients make meaning of their trauma injuries and how their arc of recovery unfolds. A burn injury can affect the spiritual needs of the burn patient and their family. In this symposium, we will discuss these unique aspects and explore the question of how suffering through this distress can aid burn survivors in moving from reliving the story of their trauma to rewriting the story of their lives.

6:30 am – 7:45 am

The session will focus on staffing strategies – flexible staffing model vs hard baseline staffing numbers, importance of specialized burn care and experience with implementing Burn Nurse Competencies, staffing for patient acuity in an environment with mixed patient profiles (Burn/ICU/Trauma/Plastics) – with an impact of achieving quality burn care and staff retention.

6:30 am – 7:45 am

Obese burn patients present numerous unique challenges. Surgical interventions are more difficult and risky, and wound care can be compromised. Nutrition interventions must take into account not only weight-based effects but also the issue of diabetes which is prevalent in this population. Drug absorption and distribution can be altered in this population. Nursing care of these patients is physically taxing, and rehabilitation and especially mobilization pose their own unique challenges in the obese. In this session, participants will discuss these problems and their strategies for dealing with them.

6:30 am – 7:45 am

The elderly burn patient has special needs with respect to nutrition and administration of medications. In this session participants will discuss the important differences between the elderly and adult burn patient in the delivery and monitoring of nutrition. The elderly burn patient is also unique with respect to the absorption and metabolism of many common medications, and this session will explode the important considerations and pitfalls in prescribing medications to this group of patients.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Necrotizing soft tissue infections remain one of the more difficult disease processes to manage and still carry a high mortality rate. Many of the management aspects still represent a challenge for clinicians including accurate and timely diagnosis, antimicrobial therapies and surgical management. This multi-format course will provide a comprehensive overview of the etiology, microbiology and surgical management, including surgical reconstruction of a variety of NSTIs as well as similar conditions such as Levamisole induced vasculitis.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

This session will begin with a holistic discussion of the multi-faceted treatment of adult and adolescent patients with self-inflicted burn injuries. National data regarding prevalence will be presented as well as research findings regarding pre-morbid characteristics and outcomes. The presenters will provide information about best practices when treating adult and pediatric patients with self-inflicted injuries. The forum will also include discussion of the impact of caring for this unique patient population on the providers and strategies for supporting the burn team.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

How in the world would you treat that? Full thickness burns next to open abdomens, complicated fractures under circumferential burns, resuscitation in patients presenting with both hemorrhagic and burn shock—what would you do? Ask the masters! In this interactive program, the challenges of managing patients with simultaneous thermal and mechanical injuries will be explored through case study. Cases will be presented to a panel of master clinicians, pausing at each critical decision point to allow panel members and audience members to discuss how they might tackle the problems at hand.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

This course will focus on understanding the Sepsis-3 criteria/guidelines and how they apply to the management of the burn patient. The course will cover the history of the sepsis revisions including consensus statements regarding burns. We will cover the most current literature regarding resuscitation of the septic patient (most up-to-date recommendations of fluids, steroids, antibiotics, monitoring, etc). We will cover unique considerations for the burn patient, share some tips and tricks for CMS compliance, strategies for navigating the electronic medical record, success with sepsis alert tools, and avoiding false sepsis triggers and wasted resources.

4:15 pm – 5:30 pm

Wildfire burns impact far more than the medical system. This session will examine the response and impact of wildfires from multiple perspectives to identify the immediate, intermediate, and long-term implications to humans, animals, and the environment.

Thursday, March 19, 2020

6:30 am – 7:45 am

The pathophysiological response to inhalation injury is significant inflammation, which could cause higher fluid resuscitation volumes, progressive lung dysfunction, prolonged need for mechanical ventilation, increased risk of developing hospital acquired pneumonia, and possible progression/development of acute respiratory distress syndrome with an associated increase in mortality. Burn clinicians need to understand how inhalation injury and its management can effect patient outcomes. Pathophysiology of inhalation injury, review of both conventional and non-conventional ventilator modes, utilization of inhaled adjuncts, management of systemic inhaled toxins, and review of chemical inhalation injury will be discussed in this session.

6:30 am – 7:45 am

This sunrise symposium will help burn care providers understand the value and importance of collaboration between nursing and therapy to maximize the functional outcomes of our burn survivors. We will discuss set up and timing of dressing changes, supplies used, and timing of therapy. We plan a practical (hands on) portion to allow nurses and therapists to collaborate and apply a dressing to a highly functional area together (i.e. shoulder, hand, hip). This approach allows burn survivors to have maximum function when dressings are applied during the acute burn injury, which maximizes function long term.

6:30 am – 7:45 am

The elderly burn patient poses many unique challenges. One of these is the decision on whether or not to operate, and the other is the timing of surgery, if planned. In this session participants will discuss the decision making process for surgery in an elderly burn patient. The ethical considerations will be taken into account. When surgery is planned, participants will discuss the pros and cons of various timing approaches (e.g. earlier vs later) surgery.

6:30 am – 7:45 am

The use of improvisational theatre techniques has been used extensively in the medical community to help professionals improve both communication and empathy. Participants will be led through various improv exercises to help them listen and connect with colleagues and with patients. These skills can easily be translated from the classroom to the workplace.

6:30 am – 7:45 am

Most burn patients complain that skin graft donor site pain is more intense and affected them more during recovery from surgery. This session will explore the mechanisms of pain for skin graft donor site and help attendees understand that they involve different pain pathways than burn wounds. The session will also address other factors that affect donor site pain such as nursing care, dressing changes, physiotherapy, and mobilization. All available options for pain management for common locations for skin graft donor site will be discussed. Participants will share their experiences and proven ideas. We will emphasize a multi-modal approach and use of regional anesthesia as well as novel molecules like liposomal bupivacaine in our discussions.

6:30 am – 7:45 am

Specialty burn centers often cover a large catchment area. Discharging patients who require specialized care can be a challenge, especially in rural areas where access to healthcare is limited. Integration of care with local providers is essential to a smooth transition back to the burn survivor’s community. Topics to address will include wound care and assessment, pain management, rehab therapies, and psychosocial support. Follow-up modalities, including the use of telemedicine will be discussed. This symposium will explore ways to provide continuity of care and ensure successful rehabilitation of burn-injured patients in rural areas after discharge from a burn center.

6:30 am – 7:45 am

Moral distress occurs when one knows what the right thing to do is, but is unable to act accordingly. Such distress arises for health care providers when doing what is best for the patient conflicts with what is best for other patients, other providers, the organization, family, or society as a whole. If unaddressed, moral distress results in moral residue, which is what we carry with us when we have been compromised morally, and the moral residue crescendo, which occurs after repeated instances of moral compromise. Situations that cause moral distress and ways to address moral distress will be discussed.

6:30 am – 7:45 am

There is a paucity of data regarding the optimal management of hyperglycemia and diabetes in the hypermetabolic burn patient in both the inpatient and outpatient setting. The purpose of this session will be to allow attendees to share local practices, successes, and barriers for achieving glycemic control in burn patients. Discussion topics will include: bridging between care settings, using insulin vs. oral agents, transitioning off continuous insulin infusions to subcutaneous insulin, the ideal goal blood glucose range, carbohydrate counting, perioperative management, patient education, endocrine service involvement, and discharge support.

10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Burn care providers are not expected to be experts in ethics, nor should they be. However, a limited understanding of bioethical principles and concepts often leads to confusion about how to apply them and can result in unnecessary ethical quandaries. The purpose of this workshop is to provide learners with the information they need to better utilize bioethical principles and concepts in patient care to optimize ethical decision making. In addition to the four principles of bioethics, topics covered will include informed consent, end-of-life decision making, surrogate decision making, and decision making for pediatric patients among others.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Supporting children throughout their burn treatment can be challenging. This session will educate on the role of the child life specialist and how this multidisciplinary role supports the mission of the burn team and family-centered care. This session will also provide multidisciplinary staff with education on post-traumatic growth and developmentally informed care and tips and tricks for age-appropriate interactions.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The ABA Professional Certification Committee members are actively working to achieve a pathway to Burn Nurse Certification. There are many moving parts to this process and we need to work together to get to the finish line! From competencies, to the scope of practice, to standards of care, all of which will lead to our ultimate goal of Burn Nurse Certification. We invite all nurses to join us in an active discussion as we continue on our journey!

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The 2018 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Pain, Agitation/Sedation, Delirium, Immobility, and Sleep Disruption in Adult Patients in the ICU provide a foundation for standardization of these disorders in critically ill patients. However, these guidelines do not specifically address the burn patient population and literature in this area is limited. The purpose of this session is to summarize the guidelines and to extrapolate these recommendations to burn patients accounting for inherent limitations in this population.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The needs of burn centers are numerous and diverse. Patients are not only looking for positive surgical outcomes, but may also be looking for psychological healing, emotional support, ways to give back, and knowledge about how to prevent future burn injuries. With limited time and resources, burn centers are stretched thin to meet all of their patients’ needs. This course will help burn centers recognize opportunities for collaboration and partnerships to assist with better burn patient outcomes and prevention of burn injuries, as well as provide examples of successful partnerships and collaborations between burn centers and community partners.

4:15 pm – 5:30 pm

Burn care providers may approach the same clinical problem using different techniques and strategies. Video is an ideal way to demonstrate a technique and convey information about a specific approach to a clinical problem in burn care. In this session, burn care providers will present a 5-7 minute video recording, of a technique involving care and treatment of a burn patient, using the theme of “How I Do It.” This session will be multidisciplinary in nature and will feature technical descriptions of treatments and interventions provided by many members of the burn team. Each video session will be followed by a 5 minute Q&A and discussion with the audience.

Friday, March 20, 2020

12:15 pm – 1:45 pm

There are many strategies for monitoring nutrition provision for burn patients. This session will review literature on the principle of nutrition monitoring and will share best practices regarding metabolic cart studies and urinary urea nitrogen measurements (UUN).

12:15 pm – 1:45 pm

This year for the ABA Global Health Forum we will focus on the activities in the Americas. Burn care professionals from North America as well as from the region will discuss the state of burn care, partnerships, successful programs, burn NGOs to be aware of, and the activities of the Federacion Latino Americana de Quemaduras.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

This MAC Forum session will review current common strategies used during most burn centers’ daily and weekly burn rounds and review current organizational behavior research to propose new ways of effective team communication and time management.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Burn injuries present numerous clinical and ethical challenges to all members of the burn team. Challenging ethical cases can haunt burn caregivers for years after the fact. Cases will be presented that raise unique challenges and provide opportunities to discuss how the core ethical principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence, autonomy, and justice should be applied. Exploring the ethical questions these cases raised with uninvolved individuals can provide a new perspective and stimulate thought-provoking discourse.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Psychosocial burn recovery requires interprofessional team expertise and patient and family inclusion. An early start in aftercare planning can help the team understand the challenges, worries, strengths, resources, coping skills, goals, and hopes of families and patients. It assists with building a compassionate understanding of their experiences and assessing readiness to plan and discuss reintegration and aftercare needs and resources. Engagement strategies as presented with a specific focus on family experiences as survivors of the burn injury, and ways through which they can be supported and empowered to assist the burn survivor with aftercare and social reintegration needs.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Team work is essential for patient safety as well as staff well-being. This session will review key elements of team development through a series of fun and engaging activities. Each activity will highlight specific skills and strategies to improve communication and team building.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

There is increasing demand for evidenced-based, high-quality burn care. However, despite considerable efforts, many burn care improvement initiatives fail to be translated into clinical practice and meaningful patient outcomes. Implementation science promotes the systematic uptake of research and other improvement initiatives into routine practice or policy. Distinct from the initiative being implemented, implementation science focuses specifically on the implementation process, and has wide applications for burn care to support translational research, quality improvement, guideline implementation, and service delivery improvements. With underpinnings in implementation science, this forum will explore how to implement successful and sustainable change in burn care.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

There are many outcome measures utilized in health care. This session will offer the learner information on the trends and application of outcome measures in burn rehabilitation therapy, with focus on relationship of measures to the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning (ICF) framework, including what qualities constitute a good outcome measure, what are the domains of mobility and hand function; and how outcome measures are used in practice to enhance documentation as well as to demonstrate evidence-based practice.