In preparation for our 52nd Annual Meeting in Orlando, we have collected our available pharmacy sessions to attend throughout the week below. Be sure to read up and register for your favorites!

Tuesday, March 17, 2020

10:00 am – 1:00 pm

The Pharmacy SIG focuses on pharmacotherapy issues in burn patients. Year-in-Review focuses on high-impact publications from the past year for infectious diseases and non-infectious diseases. Pro-Con Debate involves an interactive discussion of current pharmacologic therapies. Protocol Sharing and Patient Case Reviews allow members to discuss a variety of pharmacotherapy topics.

1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

The Fluid Resuscitation Special Interest Group aims to: (1) Describe current, changing and future resuscitation practices in adult and pediatric burn shock resuscitation; (2) Provide an opportunity for professional discussions and debate; (3) Create a venue for networking and sharing of ideas to enhance clinical practice and future research.

Wednesday, March 18, 2020

6:30 am – 7:45 am

The purpose of this session will be to allow attendees to share local inpatient and outpatient practices regarding adjunctive therapies for managing pain and sedation, as guidelines and evidence-based recommendations are lacking (e.g., ketamine, dexmedetomidine, atypical antipsychotics, liposomal bupivacaine, clonidine, methadone, etc.). Relevant issues during the transition from inpatient to outpatient care will be addressed including: ordering, dosing, preparation, administration, monitoring, safety, and efficacy endpoints.

6:30 am – 7:45 am

Among burn centers nationwide, discrepancies exist in the use of fluids for resuscitation and maintenance as well as the approach to the management of electrolyte disorders. The purpose of this session is to allow attendees to share local practices, successes, and barriers for achieving clinical outcomes in both of these areas. Fluid resuscitation algorithms, use of albumin and balanced salt solutions, maintenance fluids, sodium disorders, and electrolyte repletion protocols will be discussed.

6:30 am – 7:45 am

Obese burn patients presents numerous unique challenges. Surgical interventions are more difficult and risky, and wound care can be compromised. Nutrition interventions must take into account not only weight-based effects but also the issue of diabetes which is prevalent in this population. Drug absorption and distribution can be altered in this population. Nursing care of these patients is physically taxing, and rehabilitation and especially mobilization pose their own unique challenges in the obese. In this session, participants will discuss these problems and their strategies for dealing with them.

6:30 am – 6:45 am

The elderly burn patient has special needs with respect to nutrition and administration of medications. In this session participants will discuss the important differences between the elderly and adult burn patient in the delivery and monitoring of nutrition. The elderly burn patient is also unique with respect to the absorption and metabolism of many common medications, and this session will explore the important considerations and pitfalls in prescribing medications to this group of patients.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Necrotizing soft tissue infections remain one of the more difficult disease processes to manage and still carry a high mortality rate. Many of the management aspects still represent a challenge for clinicians including accurate and timely diagnosis, antimicrobial therapies and surgical management. This multi-format course will provide a comprehensive overview of the etiology, microbiology and surgical management, including surgical reconstruction of a variety of NSTIs as well as similar conditions such as Levamisole induced vasculitis.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

How in the world would you treat that? Full thickness burns next to open abdomens, complicated fractures under circumferential burns, resuscitation in patients presenting with both hemorrhagic and burn shock—what would you do? Ask the masters! In this interactive program, the challenges of managing patients with simultaneous thermal and mechanical injuries will be explored through case study. Cases will be presented to a panel of master clinicians, pausing at each critical decision point to allow panel members and audience members to discuss how they might tackle the problems at hand.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

This course will focus on understanding the Sepsis-3 criteria/guidelines and how they apply to the management of the burn patient. The course will cover the history of the sepsis revisions including consensus statements regarding burns. We will cover the most current literature regarding resuscitation of the septic patient (most up-to-date recommendations of fluids, steroids, antibiotics, monitoring, etc). We will cover unique considerations for the burn patient, share some tops and tricks for CMS compliance, strategies for navigating the electronic medical record, success with sepsis alert tools, and avoiding false sepsis triggers and wasted resources.

Thursday, March 19, 2020

6:30 am – 6:45 am

Investigators, especially early stage translational researchers, must make decisions about the best use of what may be scarce resources to generate pilot data or stay within the confines of a budget. Determining the best model system(s), sample sizes, variables, and controls, as well as the technology or equipment to use and what outcomes to measure, all impact the translatability of the findings, but all come at an expense. We will explore scenarios and hypotheses and for each, identify options for high quality experimental design.

6:30 am – 7:45 am

Most burn patients complain that skin graft donor site pain is more intense and affected them more during recovery from surgery. This session will explore the mechanisms of pain for skin graft donor site and help attendees understand that they involve different pain pathways than burn wounds. The session will also address other factors that affect donor site pain such as nursing care, dressing changes, physiotherapy, and mobilization. All available options for pain management for common locations for skin graft donor site will be discussed. Participants will share their experiences and proven ideas. We will emphasize a multi-modal approach and use of regional anesthesia as well as novel molecules like liposomal bupivacaine in our discussions.

6:30 am – 6:45 am

There is a paucity of data regarding the optimal management of hyperglycemia and diabetes in the hypermetabolic burn patient in both the inpatient and outpatient setting. The purpose of this session will be to allow attendees to share local practices, successes, and barriers for achieving glycemic control in burn patients. Discussion topics will include: bridging between care settings, using insulin vs. oral agents, transitioning off continuous insulin infusions to subcutaneous insulin, the ideal goal blood glucose range, carbohydrate counting, perioperative management, patient education, endocrine service involvement, and discharge support.

6:30 am – 7:45 am

This session is designed to connect leaders of clinical education in the burn community to present and discuss strategies for the preparation of students and residents for a burn rotation. Meaningful integration of these learners into the burn service will also be discussed. Examples of site-specific burn service handbooks, reference guides, and simulation exercises will be shared. Learners are also strongly encouraged to attend.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Supporting children throughout their burn treatment can be challenging. This session will educate on the role of the child life specialist and how this multidisciplinary role supports the mission of the burn team and family-centered care. This session will also provide multidisciplinary staff with education on post-traumatic growth and developmentally informed care and tips and tricks for age-appropriate interactions.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Necrotizing soft tissue infections remain one of the more difficult disease processes to manage and still carry a high mortality rate. Many of the management aspects still represent a challenge for clinicians including accurate and timely diagnosis, antimicrobial therapies and surgical management. This multi-format course will provide a comprehensive overview of the etiology, microbiology and surgical management, including surgical reconstruction of a variety of NSTIs as well as similar conditions such as Levamisole induced vasculitis.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The 2018 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Pain, Agitation/Sedation, Delirium, Immobility, and Sleep Disruption in Adult Patients in the ICU provide a foundation for standardization of these disorders in critically ill patients. However, these guidelines do not specifically address the burn patient population and literature in this area is limited. The purpose of this session is to summarize the guidelines and to extrapolate these recommendations to burn patients accounting for inherent limitations in this population.

Friday, March 20, 2020

12:15 pm – 1:45 pm

There are many strategies for monitoring nutrition provision for burn patients. This session will review literature on the principles of nutrition monitoring and will share best practices regarding metabolic cart studies and urinary urea nitrogen measurements (UUN).

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Not all therapeutic decisions in burn care are informed by large prospective randomized studies. There are often opposing approaches to the same clinical problem. Burn care providers often disagree about various therapeutic interventions for the burn patient. This session will highlight four controversial areas in burn treatment. Experts from the burn team will debate four resolutions, defending their stances on a particular care plan or strategy. Audience polling will be used to identify the attendee’s biases before the debate and their positions after the debate to see if the presented arguments change opinions.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

There is increasing demand for evidence-based, high-quality burn care. However, despite considerable efforts, many burn care improvement initiatives fail to be translated into clinical practice and meaningful patient outcomes. Implementation science promotes the systematic uptake of research and other improvement initiatives into routine practice or policy. Distinct from the initiative being implemented, implementation science focuses specifically on the implementation process, and has wide applications for burn care to support translational research, quality improvement, guideline implementation, and service delivery improvements with underpinnings in implementation science, this forum will explore how to implement successful and sustainable change in burn care.