In preparation for our 52nd Annual Meeting in Orlando, we have collected our available physician sessions to attend throughout the week below. Be sure to read up and register for your favorites!

Pre-Conference Programs

Point of Care Ultrasound (POCUS) is a useful diagnostic technique in the care of critically-ill patients. This all-day session is an entry-level course on bedside heart and lunch ultrasonography and is designed for physicians, advanced practice critical care nurses, and physician-assistants. A pre-course, on-line teaching module will introduce participants to basic POCUS principles and how to obtain and visualize standard cardiac and lung images. The session will be run by several experienced anesthesiologist instructors and will be restricted to the first 20 registrants to ensure small group teaching. Short didactic sessions will be followed by much longer hands-on image acquisition using live human models. In the morning, we will focus on cardiac image acquisition and assessment of global heart function, intra-vascular volume status, valvular activity, and identification of pericardial effusions. Following lunch (included), we will delve into lung ultrasound, with a focus on assessment of atelectasis, pleural effusions and ARDS. A post-course assessment of new POCUS skills will be offered at the end of the day.

The ABC is targeted to early career providers. It is a hands-on, simulation course introducing the clinical skills required to assess and manage common complications in adult and pediatric patients with burn injuries. Skills such as wound management, skin substitute selection and placement, and escharotomy will be taught.

The goal of the course is to improve the standard of burn care by educating providers with a needs-driven curriculum that addresses common deficiencies in burn care as identified in a national multidisciplinary needs assessment. The course is not intended to serve as a substitute for burn fellowship training or situations that require clinical reasoning beyond the one-day course content. It is the expectation that participants in the course will have taken ABLS.

Wednesday, March 18, 2020

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

How in the world would you treat that? Full thickness burns next to open abdomens, complicated fractures under circumferential burns, resuscitation in patients presenting with both hemorrhagic and burn shock—what would you do? Ask the masters! In this interactive program, the challenges of managing patients with simultaneous thermal and mechanical injuries will be explored through case study. Cases will be presented to a panel of master clinicians, pausing at each critical decision point to allow panel members and audience members to discuss how they might tackle the problems at hand.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The different aspects of burn reconstruction will be presented and discussed in a modular format, concentrating on one basic and overview topic (how to develop a reconstructive plan for an individual burn survivor), followed by a basic technique topic (local flaps), two special subjects (hand and reconstruction in the elderly), a nodule on new or adjunct technology (rehabilitation techniques like RF or ultrasound), concluding with a burn survivor’s perspective on reconstruction.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

This course will focus on understanding the Sepsis-3 criteria/guidelines and how they apply to the management of the burn patient. The course will cover the history of the sepsis revisions including consensus statements regarding burns. We will cover the most current literature regarding resuscitation of the septic patient (most up-to-date recommendations of fluids, steroids, antibiotics, monitoring, etc). We will cover unique considerations for the burn patient, share some tips and tricks for CMS compliance, strategies for navigating the electronic medical record, success with sepsis alert tools, and avoiding false sepsis triggers and wasted resources.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Necrotizing soft tissue infections remain one of the more difficult disease processes to manage and still carry a high mortality rate. Many of the management aspects still represent a challenge for clinicians including accurate and timely diagnosis, antimicrobial therapies and surgical management. This multi-format course will provide a comprehensive overview of the etiology, microbiology and surgical management, including surgical reconstruction of a variety of NSTIs as well as similar conditions such as Levamisole induced vasculitis.

Thursday, March 19, 2020

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Necrotizing soft tissue infections remain one of the more difficult disease processes to manage and still carry a high mortality rate. Many of the management aspects still represent a challenge for clinicians including accurate and timely diagnosis, antimicrobial therapies and surgical management. This multi-format course will provide a comprehensive overview of the etiology, microbiology and surgical management, including surgical reconstruction of a variety of NSTIs as well as similar conditions such as Levamisole induced vasculitis.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The 2018 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Pain, Agitation/Sedation, Delirium, Immobility, and Sleep Disruption in Adult Patients in the ICU provide a foundation for standardization of these disorders in critically ill patients. However, these guidelines do not specifically address the burn patient population and literature in this area is limited. The purpose of this session is to summarize the guidelines and to extrapolate these recommendations to burn patients accounting for inherent limitations in this population.

4:15 pm – 5:30 pm

A favorite session among attendees. Editors from each of the top publications in burn care present and discuss major advances in published burn research throughout the past year. Journals represented include: Journal of Burn Care & Research; Wound Repair and Regeneration; Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery; and Burns.

4:15 pm – 5:30 pm

Burn care providers may approach the same clinical problem using different techniques and strategies. Video is an ideal way to demonstrate a technique and convey information about a specific approach to a clinical problem in burn care. In this session, burn care providers will present a 5-7 minute video recording, of a technique involving care and treatment of a burn patient, using the theme of “How I Do It”. This session will be multidisciplinary in nature and will feature technical descriptions of treatments and interventions provided by many members of the burn team. Each video session will be followed by a 5 minute Q&A and discussion with the audience.

Friday, March 20, 2020

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Not all therapeutic decisions in burn care are informed by large prospective randomized studies. There are often opposing approaches to the same clinical problem. Burn care providers often disagree about various therapeutic interventions for the burn patient. This session will highlight four controversial areas in burn treatment. Experts from the burn team will debate four resolutions, defending their stances on a particular care plan or strategy. Audience polling will be used to identify the attendee’s biases before the debate and their positions after the debate to see if the presented arguments change options.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

There is increasing demand for evidenced-based, high-quality burn care. However, despite considerable efforts, many burn care improvement initiatives fail to be translated into clinical practice and meaningful patient outcomes. Implementation science promotes the systematic uptake of research other improvement initiatives into routine practice or policy. Distinct from the initiative being implemented, implementation science focuses specifically on the implementation process, and has wide applications for burn care to support translational research, quality improvement, guideline implementation, and service delivery improvements. With underpinnings in implementation science, this forum will explore how to implement successful and sustainable change in burn care.